New residents

1.Overview

The City of Blacktown is the second largest Local Government Area in NSW with a population of 340,000 that is constantly growing and proudly diverse with more than 180 nationalities represented.

Council hosts numerous festivals and community events for our residents to enjoy. The area also boasts a large number of shopping

centres, recreational facilities and sporting grounds for all residents to use.

2.Update your personal details

Before learning about all that Blacktown City has to offer, you should make sure you have updated your new address details and let everyone know where they can find you.

You can update your family pets microchip and registration details by contacting the Blacktown City Animal Holding Facility.

415 Flushcombe Rd, Prospect. Ph: 9839 6161

Notify the following government departments of your change of address:

Electoral Roll

Roads and Maritime Service 

Don't forget to update your details with each of the following providers:

  • Medicare

  • Electricity company

  • Phone company

  • Health fund

  • Bank

  • Insurance

  • Your work place

  • Health Care providers

  • Doctors

  • VET

  • Road side assistance provider. 

3.Our suburbs

Blacktown is a modern bustling city of 48 residential suburbs, home to over 340,000 people, making it the second largest city by population in NSW. Blacktown City suburbs and postcodes are:

  • Acacia Gardens 2763. Formerly a part of Quakers Hill, the name was chosen to reflect the rural quality of the suburb. It was formally recognized as a suburb in 1996. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown & District. Alan Sharpe, 2000)  

  • Arndell Park 2148. Named after Thomas Arndell who was appointed Assistant Surgeon to the settlement in NSW and arrived with the First Fleet. He later joined Captain Tench in 1789 in the journey of exploration from Prospect Hill to the Nepean River. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown & District. Alan Sharpe, 2000)  

  • Bidwill 2770. Named after John Carne Bidwill (1815-1853) appointed as botanist in charge at the Botanic Gardens in 1847. 
    (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section)  

  • Blackett 2770. Named after George Forster Blackett, Superintendent of the Government Cattle Station at Rooty Hill, 1820-1830. 
    (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section). 

  • Blacktown 2148. Blacktown is closely bound to the original inhabitants of Australia, the Aborigines. The Aboriginal settlement and the Colebee/ Nurragingy land grant beside Richmond Road gave birth to the name Black Town. In a letter dated 24 June 1822, the name is revealed for the first time. Later, in 1860, when the railway line reached Black Town Road, the locality had no name. The second timetable for the line, printed in 1862, shows the railway station simply as Blacktown. (Source: The Seven Hills, A Village Divided, A Suburb United. Jack Brook 2004)  

  • Bungarribee 2767. A residential suburb on the site of the Bungarribee property, owned initially by John Campbell, who was granted 2,000 acres (approx. 810 ha) in 1821. The property was resumed by the Commonwealth Government during World War II and served as an overshoot airfield. It was used by the Overseas Telecommunications Commission from 1949 to the early 1990s. (Source: Doonside Residential Parcel, Western Sydney Parklands: conservation management plan. Godden Mackay Logan 2007) 

  • Colebee 2761. Colebee was the first Aboriginal person in Australia to be given a land grant by Governor Lachlan Macquarie in 1819. The grant was promised to two significant Aboriginal figures, Colebee and Nurragingy, however only Colebee's name appeared on the grant. The Colebee Centre at Nurragingy Reserve is also named after him. (Source: Where the country became the city. Blacktown and District Historical Society 1996) 

  • Dean Park 2761. Named after the Dean family. William Dean (1776 or 1778/79-1847) was granted 200 acres (81 ha) beside Eastern Creek and the family owned the Bush Inn on the Western Highway. (Source: Eastern Creek - The Early Days. Margaret Lovely and George Nicolaidis)  

  • Dharruk 2770. The Aboriginal people of the Western Cumberland Plain refer to themselves as the Darug (also spelt Dharug, Darul, Dharuk or Dharruk). The three clans of the Blacktown area include: Gomerigal - South Creek; Wawarawarry - Eastern Creek; and Warmuli - Prospect. The impact of white settlement meant that there was competition for land and resources. While numbers declined there has always been an aboriginal presence in Blacktown and today this is reflected in the name of the City and its suburbs Dharruk, Colebee, Marayong and Toongabbie and the fact that Blacktown has one of the largest Aboriginal populations in NSW. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown & District. Alan Sharpe, 2000) 

  • Doonside 2767. Early settler Robert Crawford (1799—1848) named his 2,000 acre (approx. 810 ha) grant after his home town in Scotland. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000)  

  • Eastern Creek 2766. The eastern branch of South Creek became known as Eastern Creek. The village that grew where the road crossed the creek became known as Eastern Creek. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000)  

  • Emerton 2770. Named after William Frederick Emert, a native of Siglingen, Germany, who arrived in Australia in 1853. In 1861 he became a storekeeper and postmaster in Mount Druitt. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000) 

  • Glendenning 2761. Named after William Glendenning a butcher who, in the early 1900s, had a shop in Jersey Road, Plumpton and who slaughtered stock in Lamb Street, near Owen Street. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000) 

  • Glenwood 2768. Named for an historic property in the area - Glenwood Park House , named Glenwood Park in the 1940s, but previously known as Norfolk Vale (1846 — 1882), and Sorrento (1882 — 1941). It was formally recognized as a suburb in 1996. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000)  

  • Hassall Grove 2761. Named for Reverend Rowland Hassall (1768—1820), who was associated with the area as a Church of England Minister. He also acted as agent for the estates of Phillip Parker King and managed Samuel Marsden's properties in his absence.
    (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section)  

  • Hebersham 2770. In 1829 the Trustees of the Clergy and Schools Lands in New South Wales planned to establish a village named Hebersham on the Western Highway, west of Eastern Creek. This never happened, but the name was used for this present day suburb. Hebersham was coined to honour Bishop Heber of Calcutta whose diocese included New South Wales. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000)  

  • Huntingwood 2148. This composite name was chosen because the first English-style hunting is said to have taken place here and the "Woods Estate", owned by the Woods family for nearly a century, is located within the suburb. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000) 

  • Kellyville Ridge 2155. Kellyville Ridge was originally part of Kellyville (named after land owner Hugh Kelly in 1884 who operated a coach-stop inn on Windsor Road) and was named after a geographical ridge that runs through the suburb. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section)  

  • Kings Langley 2147. Early settler Matthew Pearce (1762—1831) called his 130 acre (53 ha) grant after King's Langley Manor House in Hertfordshire, England, where he was born. Pearce's grant was situated on the opposite side of the Windsor Road to the present day suburb of Kings Langley, which was officially named a 'neighbourhood' in 1976. (Source: Where the country became the city. Blacktown and District Historical Society 1996)  

  • Kings Park 2148. Originally this suburb formed part of Marayong, but with increased residential development, residents wanted a separate identity, and the developer's estate name was adopted in 1987. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section)  

  • Lalor Park 2147. Named after the Lalor family, who owned property in the area. Two members of the family (George and Robert) were Councillors on Blacktown Shire Council, George serving as Shire President on two occasions, 1921-1923 and 1928.The land was resumed for public housing and George's daughter, Miss Louise Lalor in 1957 suggested the area be called Lalor Park. (Source: The Seven Hills, A Village Divided, A Suburb United. Jack Brook 2004)  

  • Lethbridge Park 2770. Named after the Lethbridge family. Robert Copeland Lethbridge settled at Werrington on a land grant made on 1 January 1806. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section)  

  • Marayong 2148. Name adopted by the Railway Department in 1922, the word is Aboriginal for "emu". (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000)  

  • Marsden Park 2765. Named for Samuel Marsden (1764—1838), Church of England Minister and landowner in the area. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section)  

  • Minchinbury 2770. Minchinbury is named after Captain William Minchin who was granted land (1,000 acres) west of Rooty Hill in 1819 and named it Minchinbury. After Minchin's death the Estate was sold and later bought by Dr Charles Mackay who introduced grape vines for winemaking. (Source: Where the country became the city. Blacktown and District Historical Society 1996)  

  • Mount Druitt 2770. Major George Druitt (1775—1842) was granted 2,000 acres (810 ha) in the area by Governor Macquarie. He named his grant Mount Druitt. (Source: A History of the Manse and Mount Druitt Estate, G Nicolaidis 30/12/90)  

  • Oakhurst 2761. This suburb was developed by Landcom in 1981 when zoning changed from rural to residential. Prior to the name change, it was a part of Plumpton. Landcom named the development the Oakhurst Estate, and the estate name was adopted as the suburb name. It is believed that the "Oaks" house provided part of the name, with 'hurst' (meaning hillock or wooded eminence) being added. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section)  

  • Parklea 2768.  Parklea dates back to the early 1900s and is believed to be named by subdividers at the time. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section) 

  • Plumpton 2761.  The area was initially known as Woodstock, but when a Post Office was established in 1889, there was confusion over this Woodstock and a railway station on the Blayney-Harden line, also called Woodstock. Walter Lamb (1825—1906) established a fruit preserving works and a coursing (type of greyhound race) track on his property "Woodstock". Coursing in England was conducted at Plumpton, so that name replaced Woodstock. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000) 

  • Prospect 2148. Prospect Hill was discovered by Captain Arthur Phillip in April 1788 on one of his first explorations in the colony. Phillip named it "Belle Vue", later anglicized to Prospect Hill and then shortened to Prospect. (Source: Where the country became the city. Blacktown and District Historical Society 1996) 

  • Quakers Hill 2763. The railway siding in this area was known as Douglas' Siding. When subdivision of large properties was undertaken in the early 1900s, the developers named the suburb Quakers Hill, a name that had been associated with the hill since 1806. (Source: Where the country became the city. Blacktown and District Historical Society 1996)

  • Riverstone 2765.  Lieutenant-Colonel Maurice Charles O'Connell was granted 2,500 acres (1010 ha) by Governor Macquarie in this area. He named his grant "Riverston" after his birthplace in Ireland. When the Railway Station was established, an "e" was added to the name. (Source: Riverstone - Schofields, A Community Survey. Garrett Barry, et al 1980). 

  • Rooty Hill 2766.  Rooty Hill was the centre of the government administration for the area and has been known as Rooty Hill since 1810. There are varying suggestions about the name's origin, including the amount of tree roots that were cleared to create a road in the area, or from the Hindi word for food, "ruti". There is also a suggestion it was named after Rooty Hill Road on Norfolk Island, where Governor King spent time in 1788. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section)

  • Ropes Crossing 2760.  Named after Anthony Rope, a convict who arrived with the First Fleet in 1788. He married a female convict, Elizabeth Pulley in May 1788. Rope learned bricklaying whilst working at Brickfields near Sydney and later moved to the Nepean District. In 1806, the Ropes were renting 48 acres on the Nepean and by 1820 had been granted 20 acres in the district. Anthony Rope died at Castlereagh in 1843. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section) 

  • Rouse Hill 2155. Rouse Hill is thought to be named after Richard Rouse who received a land grant in 1813 and built a house in the area. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section) 

  • Schofields 2762.  Named for early settler John Schofield, who had a square mile (259 ha) of land. Schofield's Siding was built on this land in 1870. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000)

  • Seven Hills 2147. The name Seven Hills was first recorded in the annals of Australian history in July 1800. Governor Lachlan Macquarie commented that he had journeyed over seven hills on his way to Windsor. The seven hills are situated along the old road between Westmead and where Norwest Blvd crosses Old Windsor Rd. The name was transferred to the railway station in 1860 and this cemented the name to the growing village. (Source: The Seven Hills, A Village Divided, A Suburb United. Jack Brook 2004)

  • Shalvey 2770. Shalvey was named by the Housing Commission of New South Wales after wholesale and retail butcher; Patrick Shalvey who acquired several properties for grazing purposes, including an area between Mount Druitt and St Marys in 1906. There are also suggestions Shalvey is named after the main road in the area which was originally owned by the Crown. (Source: Patrick Joseph Shalvey, Historical Feature. By Alderman George Nicolaidis, 30/12/90. Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section)  

  • Shanes Park 2760. John Harris (1754 -1838) came to Australia on the Second Fleet in 1790 and was appointed Chief Surgeon of the colony. By the turn of the century, he owned 315 acres of land, and had built Experiment Farm Cottage. The suburb of Harris Park is named for him. Among his many landholdings included a property on South Creek known as Shane's Park Estate. The suburb takes its name from his property. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000) 

  • Stanhope Gardens 2768. John Hillas (1768-1837) arrived in Australia in 1801 and received two land grants on the Windsor Road. One of these he named "Stanhope Farm", and established an inn, the "Stanhope Arms". Part of the name remained, with the Peel family calling their dairy farm "Stanhope Park". The suburb name reflects these early properties. It was formally recognized as a suburb in 1996. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000)

  • St Marys (part of) 2760. Initially known as South Creek, it takes its name from the church St Mary Magdalene on the Great Western Highway. Once the church was built, the names South Creek and St Marys were used interchangeably - the St Marys Post Office opened in 1840 but it was not until 1885 that the railway station became St Marys. (Source: Dharug and Dungaree: the history of Penrith and St Marys to 1860, Robert Murray and Kate White, 1988) 

  • The Ponds 2769. This suburb in Blacktown, south of Windsor Rd, between Kellyville Ridge and Stanhope Gardens, has been named after the waterways flowing through the area, including Second Ponds Creek. The name was proposed in 2006 and gazetted in January 2007. The first lots sold in the area in July 2007. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section) 

  • Toongabbie (part of) 2146. Named by Governor Arthur Phillip from the Dharruk word meaning "meeting of the waters". A Government Farm was established here in 1791 and continued for thirteen years. The land was used for grazing cattle and then was granted to various people. In the late 1890s many orchards were located here. A separate railway line ran from Toongabbie station to the quarries at Prospect from 1902 to 1945. (Source: The Toongabbie story. Doris Sargeant, 1964) 

  • Tregear 2770. John King Lethbridge bought land in the area and built a fine homestead, which he called "Tregeare" in 1871 after his great uncle's property in England - now known as Tregear. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section)

  • Vineyard (part of) 2765. Was originally part of Windsor's winegrowing district and takes its name from the surrounding vineyards. 
    (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000)  

  • Whalan 2770. Named for James Whalan, who was granted 300 acres (122 ha) at Mount Druitt in 1831. (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000) 

  • Willmot 2770. Named after Thomas Willmot (1851—1938) who was elected the first President of the Blacktown Shire Council. He was President on a number of occasions, 1906—1910 and 1912 — 1913. (Source: Blacktown City Libraries Local History Section)  

  • Woodcroft 2767. This suburb is based on the development by L J Hooker of the former State Brickworks. L J Hooker purchased the property in 1989, and after rezoning, residential construction commenced in 1992. It was formally recognized as a suburb in 1996. 
    (Source: Pictorial History, Blacktown and District. Alan Sharpe, 2000)